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RESEARCH

Selected publications from the P.L.E.A. Lab and its collaborators

THE WRONGFUL CONVICTION LAW REVIEW

Wilford, M. M., Gonzales, J. E., & Khairalla, A. (accepted). When pleas precede evidence: Using Bayesian analyses to establish the importance of a reasonable standard for evidence prior to plea offers.

 

JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY

DiFava, R. J., Bettens, T., Wilford, M. M., & Redlich, A. D. (in press). Confession evidence results in more true and false guilty pleas than eyewitness evidence. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-023-09577-7

PSYCHOLOGY, CRIME AND LAW

Redlich, A. D., Wilford, M. M., DiPano, M.,& Berger, N. (in press). Commonalities in false guilty plea cases. https://doi.org/10.1080/1068316X.2023.2213381


JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY

Yan, S., Wilford, M. M., & Ferreira, P. A. (in press). Terms and conditions apply: The effect of probation length and detailed disclosure on true and false guilty pleashttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-022-09543-9

 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND BEHAVIOR

Henderson, K. S., Sutherland, K. T., Wilford, M. M. (2023). “Reject the offer”: The asymmetric impact of defense attorneys’ plea recommendations. https://doi.org/10.1177/00938548231172515

PSYCHOLOGY, CRIME AND LAW

Wilford, M. M., & Bornstein, B. H. (2023). The disappearing trial: How social scientists can help save the jury from extinction. https://doi.org/10.1080/1068316X.2021.1984482

JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: APPLIED

Wilford, M. M., Zimmerman, D., Yan, S., & Sutherland, K. T. (2021). Innocence in the shadow of COVID-19: Plea decision making during a pandemic. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3724

LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR

Wilford, M. M., Sutherland, K. T., Gonzales, J. E., & Rabinovich, M. (2021). Guilt status influences plea outcomes beyond the shadow-of-the-trial in an interactive simulation of legal procedures.  https://doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000450

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Wilford, M. M., Wells, G. L., & Frazier, A. (2021). Plea-bargaining law: The impact of innocence, trial penalty, and conviction probability on plea outcomes. https://www.doi.org/10.1007/s12103-020-09564-y

LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR

Smith, A. M., Wilford, M. M., Wells, G. L., & Quigley-McBride, A. (2019). Mistaken eyewitness identification rates increase when either witnessing or testing conditions get worse. https://doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000334

PSYCHOLOGY, PUBLIC POLICY, AND LAW

Wilford, M. M., & Redlich, A. D. (2018). Deciphering the guilty plea: Where research can inform policy. https://doi.org/10.1037/law0000169

 
PSYCHOLOGY, PUBLIC POLICY AND LAW

Wilford, M. M., & Wells, G. L. (2018). Bluffed by the dealer: Distinguishing false pleas from false confessions. https://doi.org/10.1037/law0000165

PSYCHOLOGY, CRIME AND LAW

Wilford, M. M., Van Horn, M. C., Penrod, S. D., & Greathouse, S. M. (2018). Not separate but equal? The impact of multiple-defendant trials on juror decision-making. https://www.doi.org/10.1080/1068316X.2017.1351969

PSYCHOLOGY, PUBLIC POLICY, AND LAW

Redlich, A. D., Wilford, M. M., & Bushway, S. (2017). Understanding guilty pleas through the lens of social science [Special anniversary issue]. https://doi.org/10.1037/law0000142

 
JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: APPLIED

Wilford, M. M., Chan, J. C. K., & Tuhn, S. J. (2014). Retrieval enhances eyewitness suggestibility to misinformation in free and cued recall. https://www.doi.org/10.1037/xap0000001

JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN MEMORY AND COGNITION

Wells, G. L., Wilford, M. M., & Smalarz, L. (2013). Forensic science testing: The forensic filler-control method for controlling contextual bias, estimating error rates, and calibrating analysts' reports. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jarmac.2013.01.004

JOURNAL OF MEMORY AND LANGUAGE

Chan, J. C. K., Wilford, M. M., & Hughes, K. L. (2012). Retrieval can increase or decrease suggestibility depending on how memory is tested: The importance of source complexity. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2012.02.006

 
PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Wilford, M. M., & Wells, G. L. (2010). Does facial processing prioritize change detection? Change-blindness illustrates costs and benefits of holistic processing. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797610385952

Recent Publications
Simulation Technology
Computers

Cutting-edge simulation technology

The Plea Justice Project provides an interactive simulation of legal procedures, offering an alternative to existing paradigms in legal decision-making research (e.g., vignettes/narratives, high-stakes deception studies; Redlich et al., 2017;

Wilford et al., 2019)

This technology allows researchers to design their own customizable computer simulation of a variety of legal proceedings with unique actors and dialogues, used here in ongoing NSF-funded data collection. 

Conference Table
Advisory Panels
Advisory Panels

With funding from the National Science Foundation, Dr. Wilford has convened advisory panels to further the broad objectives of the Plea Justice project. The panels have included renowned experts in the fields of psychology, law, and public policy. Two different panels convened in 2019 and 2022 at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. The final panel will convene in 2024 at Iowa State University.  Please find further information regarding each panel below.

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The second advisory panel centered around effective methods of recruitment for juvenile participants, and ways of effectively assessing juvenile comprehension of legal procedures. Many thanks to Dr. Tarika Daftary-Kapur, Dr. Rebecca K. Helm, Dr. Lindsay C. Malloy, Dr. Jodi A. Quas, Dr. Allison D. Redlich, Dr. Jennifer Woolard, and Dr. Tina M. Zottoli for their participation.

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The first advisory panel was focused on ways of making the Plea Justice simulation attractive to current guilty plea researchers. Many thanks to Atty. Karen Smolar, Dr. Vanessa Edkins, Dr. Erika Fountain, Dr. Annabelle Frazier, Dr. Kelsey Henderson, Dr. Allison D. Redlich, Dr. Tina M. Zottoli and their students for participating.

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